Wednesday, March 8, 2017

English Pathways to Child Care and Child Development


Schools and colleges are seeing a greater emphasis on, and in some cases, funding for, English for the Workplace, as opposed to English for general purposes. At the poster session, I talked about how Mission College (Santa Clara) has been meeting the English language needs of parents, child care providers, and early childhood educators. English for Child Care-Child Development curriculum was created through needs assessment, materials research/development, and collaboration among English as a Second Language (ESL) and Child Development (CHD) college faculty, community leaders, and workforce development. We started with one course in 2000 and have grown to four courses. The sections that are taught on-campus enroll a wide range of students, while the ones that are taught off-campus at a professional training site target employed (or underemployed) child care providers, in other words, people already in the workforce.

In addition to the four college courses spanning ESL Levels 3–6, my co-authors (Marianne Brems and Julaine Rosner) and I have created course materials (books + audio) where there are no others on the market. We would be happy to share the curriculum, our experiences, and information on the books with interested parties. They are being used not only in college ESL departments, but also in I-BEST programs, community centers, and non-profit organizations across North America and overseas.

The Mission College research office collected data from five semesters (Fall 2013-Fall 2015) on the retention and success of students who took ESL 930ECC and/or ESL 940ECC classes (“ESLCC” for short) using the English for Child Care course material, and who subsequently took a CHD course. These data show:
  • The success rate of students who took ESLCC before taking CHD exceeds the average of all students who took CHD (i.e., native and non-native English speakers).
  • The retention rate of students who took ESLCC before taking CHD exceeds the average of all students who took CHD.

Child Development Course
Course Title
ESLCC Students
Success Rate
Retention Rate
CHD*001
Child Growth and Development
18
88.9%
100.0%
CHD*002
Child, Family, and Community
9
100.0%
100.0%
CHD*008A
Practicum A
6
100.0%
100.0%
CHD*010
Principles and Practices in Education
19
100.0%
100.0%
CHD*017
Child Health and Safety
11
90.9%
90.9%
CHD*026
Introduction to Curriculum
10
90.0%
90.0%
TOTAL
73
94.5%
97.3%

Further research is desired, including the success and retention rate of students who have taken ESL 950ECD and ESL 960ECD prior to enrolling in a CHD course, but since the researcher left the college, data collection is difficult. 

Additional resources

  • Handout from a session delivered at NAEYC PDI 2016 (National Association of Educators of Young Children Professional Development Institute) handout
  • Content-Based Instruction (CBI) at the Community College Level: Is It Feasible? blog post
  • English for Child Care: Language Skills for Parents and Providers slides
  • English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers video introduction 
  • ECC and ECD publisher: Sunburst Media
Below are photos of a two-sided poster display.

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